Weekly Homework

Literature and the Environment

Homework: Week 8

Study for Quiz on Thursday (Feb. 26) Quiz will cover the following texts:

  • Mary Austin, “Land of Little Rain”
  • Luther Standing Bear, “Nature”
  • Nabokov, from Speak Memory
  • Sigurd Olson, “Northern Lights”
  • René Dubos, “A Family of Landscapes”
  • Aldo Leopold, from a Sand County Almanac
  • Rachel Carson, “The Marginal World”
  • Noel Perrin, “Pig Tales”
  • Edward Abbey, “The Serpents Of Paradise”
  • Edward Abbey, “The Great American Desert”

 

Homework: Week  5 Feb. 3 & 5
Readings due:
TUESDAY Feb. 3
Charles Darwin, from the Voyage of the Beagle (in Norton)
Charles Darwin, from On the Origin of Species (in Norton)
Charles Darwin, from The Descent of Man (in Norton)

THURSDAY Feb.  5
Samuel Clemens, from Life on the Mississippi (in Norton)
John Muir, “A Wind-Storm in the Forests” (in Norton)
John Muir, from A Thousand-Mile Walk to the Gulf (excerpt, linked from syllabus)

Writing: Due Tuesday: Note one passage from each text by Darwin (3 total) that you find interesting, puzzling, effective, or confounding.  Analyze each passage briefly in terms of its environmental implications. Length (1 page, single spaced)

Writing: Due Thursday: Note one passage from each of today’s texts (1 by Mark Twain/Samuel Clemens, 1 by Muir) that you find interesting, puzzling, effective, or confounding.  Analyze each passage briefly in terms of its environmental implications. Length (1 page, single spaced)

***********************************************************************************

Homework: Week 4

Reading for Tues Jan 27 : Emerson, Thoreau

Presentations: Arnaud

Reading for Thurs Jan 29: Whitman, Bryant, Whitcomb

Presentations: Alyse

Writing: Due both days but collected Thursday: Note one passage from each author (Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Bryant) that you find interesting, puzzling, effective, or confounding.  Analyze this passage briefly in terms of the environment. Length (1-2 pages, single spaced)

***********************************************************************************

Homework: Week 3

Due Tues. Jan. 20 
Reading: Crèvecoeur: From Letters from an American Farmer (in Norton)
Crèvecoeur: From Sketches of Eighteenth century America (in Norton)
“The Land of Cockaigne” (linked from syllabus)
Bartram: From Travels through North & South Carolina, Georgia, East & West Florida (in Norton)
Lewis and Clark, from The Journals of Lewis and Clark (in Norton)
Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s “Kubla Khan” (linked from syllabus)
William Wordsworth’s “Tintern Abbey” (linked from syllabus)
Dorothy Wordsworth, from the Journal (in Norton)

Analysis: Note one passage from each text that you find interesting, puzzling, effective, or confounding.  Be prepared to discuss this passage in class.

Due Thurs. Jan 22
Reading: David Thompson, from Narrative of His Explorations in Western America, 1784–1812 (in Norton)
John Wesley Powell, from Exploration of the Colorado River of the West and Its Tributaries
Alison Byerly, “The Uses of Landscape” (in the Ecocriticism Reader)

Writing: Graded assignment (Creative).
1-2 pages, free-form.  The “Land of Cockaigne” is a natural, utopian paradise that has persisted since antiquity.  For this short assignment, describe your own version of the “Cockaigne.”

***********************************************************************************

Homework: Week 2

Graded as Full Credit (A), Partial Credit (C), or No Credit (F)

Due Tuesday January 13

Reading: Lynn White, Jr: “The historical roots of our ecologic crisis” by Lynn White Jr (in the Ecocriticism Reader)

Writing: Lynn White’s essay is filled with controversial theses, all of which tend to criticize the Judeo-Christian religious tradition.  Read the essay, locate one such assertion, and offer a refutation or further support in one succinct paragraph.  To get full credit you must proofread, cite from the text, and have a coherent argument.

Due Thursday January 15

Reading: Donna Haraway’s “Manifesto” (sent by email)

Writing: Donna Haraway’s “Manifesto” is challenging reading.  Identify a short passage (a paragraph or so) that you found difficult and paraphrase it into common, every-day English.  To get full credit you must identify the section, paraphrase it, and proofread your work.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s